Tag: skin cancer

On May 17th I will have Mohs surgery

  I saw a doctor the other day about my skin cancer.  He told me about it and the options and asked what treatment I wanted.  I like the doctor a great deal.  I am glad my doctor recommend him.
  May 17 (2017) I will go in and have the basal cell carcinoma removed.  
 
   I am going to have what is called “Mohs Surgery.”  

 

Mohs surgery, developed in 1938 by a general surgeon, Frederic E. Mohs, is microscopically controlled surgery used to treat common types of skin cancer. During the surgery, after each removal of tissue and while the patient waits, the tissue is examined for cancer cells. That examination informs the decision for additional tissue removal. Mohs surgery is one of the many methods of obtaining complete margin control during removal of a skin cancer (CCPDMA – complete circumferential peripheral and deep margin assessment[1][2][3][4]) using frozen sectionhistology.[5][6]CCPDMA or Mohs surgery allows for the removal of a skin cancer with very narrow surgical margin and a high cure rate.

 

  I do not plan to blog about the surgery as it happens or even take photos or video.  
I suspect you will see me with a hat on from now on. 

Diagnosis C44.91 – Basal Cell Carcinoma of Skin

    I just heard from my doctor’s office.  The lab results are back and the place on top of my head is a Basal cell carcinoma.  They are going to get me an appointment with a Dermatology doctor in Fort Worth.  

 

Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common.

Anyone can get skin cancer, but it is more common in people who

  • Spend a lot of time in the sun or have been sunburned
  • Have light-colored skin, hair, and eyes
  • Have a family member with skin cancer
  • Are over age 50

You should have your doctor check any suspicious skin markings and any changes in the way your skin looks. Treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy (PDT), and biologic therapy. PDT uses a drug and a type of laser light to kill cancer cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body’s own ability to fight cancer.   ICD-List Diagnosis Code

  I just wait now for the doctor’s office to inform me of my appointment date.  I was told that it might be five or six weeks before my appointment.

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