Tag: basal cell carcinoma

Seborrheic Keratosis and Basal Cell Carcinoma

I got the lab work on my biopsy.  I had a Seborrheic Keratosis removed from left shoulder.  It was large.  The biopsy was not cancer.  
  

Seborrheic keratosis (seb-o-REE-ik ker-uh-TOE-sis) is one of the most common noncancerous skin growths in older adults.

A seborrheic keratosis usually appears as a brown, black or light tan growth on the face, chest, shoulders or back. The growth has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance. Seborrheic keratoses don’t become cancerous and aren’t thought to be related to sun exposure, but they can look like skin cancer.

 

Seborrheic keratoses are normally painless and require no treatment. You may decide to have them removed if they become irritated by clothing or for cosmetic reasons.    Mayo Clinic

  I also had a lesion on top of my head.  A biopsy of it came back as “Basal Cell Carcinoma.” 

 

Basal cell carcinoma is a type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma begins in the basal cells — a type of cell within the skin that produces new skin cells as old ones die off.

Basal cell carcinoma often appears as a slightly transparent bump on the skin, though it can take other forms. Basal cell carcinoma occurs most often on areas of the skin that are exposed to the sun, such as your head and neck.

 

Most basal cell carcinomas are thought to be caused by long-term exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight. Avoiding the sun and using sunscreen may help protect against basal cell carcinoma.     Mayo Clinic 

  My doctor is arranging for me to see a surgeon (Dermatologist).  

  

Shoulder after Seborrheic Keratosis was removed.

Head after biopsy

 

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